Tag Archives: prophets

For Times of Crisis: A Silo Full of Faith

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The silo John and Ruth left full of wheat.

The silo holds almost four tons of wheat. The grain was put there more than 30 years ago by two loving people who hoped to provide food for their children’s families in case they Granary Paris 2019Oc DSC01556might face scarcity or famine someday.

Now, the wheat is probably not usable for food anymore—but what those two people left behind may be much more valuable than food.

John and Ruth were farm people. They knew years when the crops didn’t grow well or didn’t sell for enough money. They had lived through the Depression of the 1930s. They never spent money they did not have or wasted anything that might be put to good use sometime. Up in the old barn there are buckets of rusty nails and bolts that John meant to straighten out, clean up, and reuse one day.

John and Ruth were my in-laws. I learned to admire them for what they had become in life and what they were willing to sacrifice to assure a decent life for others—especially their children. Inside that silo full of grain, taped to the inner door, they left a note Granary note 2019Oc DSC01547 Sspecifying what they wanted done with the wheat. “It is here to be preserved for a time of need,” John wrote. “We do not expect to live to see the day when all of this will be used for human food, but say to our family you may take from it as needed for your use. . . . We want you to respect our wish that none of it is to be sold for monetary gain but may be traded for other food items if needed. We are dedicating this wheat to help sustain the lives of those who may need it . . . .”

The grain was accumulated from their crops over 10 years, the last bags being added in 1987. The company that bagged the wheat told them it would last “for a lifetime.”

Maybe no one anticipated that the galvanized steel granary could begin to rust out near the bottom. Rodents and deer, getting at a few of the bags through small holes at the base of the silo, have nibbled at the wheat. A nutritional expert tells us the grain is probably not good for human food anymore but might be used to feed animals.

John and Ruth had faith that they were helping provide for their descendants in the way a loving Father in Heaven wanted them to do. They wrote of scriptural and prophetic counsel to store food for a future time of need. But perhaps they did not realize what kind of food they were really leaving behind: nourishment for the spirit, in a store of faith that is strongly felt in their note. It’s impossible to read their words without being deeply moved, and without asking ourselves what we might be leaving behind for our own descendants.

Ruth was an example of service to others in their small farming community.

John became one of my models of integrity in life, since I had grown up without a father.

The two of them may not have left their family worldly wealth, but I believe no parents could have done more for their children in those circumstances. Their examples have helped mold the lives of their children and their children’s children.

Now we are living in times of crisis when there is an urgent, pressing need for faith. I have to ask myself: Have I given my children and their children an example of faith that will help to carry them through perilous times to come? Surely those times are coming. How can I help them to store up the faith they will yet need?

If I could choose one thing to leave them, it would be faith to rely on prophets and the spiritual nourishment found in the scriptures and revelations given for our day.

[NOTE: The name of this blog has been changed from Searlebration. The blog began as a way of reaching our extended family, but it has grown beyond that, and the new name better reflects the subject matter. ]

 

To the Question: Is There a God?

The eminent physicist Stephen Hawking said recently that he does not believe there is a God. With all due respect to Mr. Hawking’s knowledge and accomplishments—and they are truly noteworthy—I do not believe he is what the courts would call a competent witness on this topic. I doubt that he has the knowledge or expertise to testify on the matter.

There would be two significant problems with taking Mr. Hawking’s word that there is no God. First, while he seems to have made himself as familiar as anyone can with the workings of the universe, this is no indication that he has made himself similarly familiar with the workings of God. Second, and more important, it is not for Mr. Hawking, or anyone else, to tell us whether there is a God. Each one of us has the opportunity—the responsibility, in fact—to learn this for ourselves.

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How can the order and symmetry of the universe and the things in it have come about through the workings of unexplainable, unguided forces?

We ought to be able to do this with a kind of scientific experiment or an application of the scientific method. Our experiment would have to begin with a hypothesis, and since it seems impossible to prove a negative, the hypothesis would have to be positive: “There is a God.” (Every atheistic assertion I have ever seen comes down ultimately to this: “I know there is no God, because I have not seen Him. He has not shown Himself to me.” This is not only arrogant, but silly—and obviously inconclusive.) However, in order to prove our hypothesis that there is a God, we would have to investigate according to rules He has established, and this would require faith. We would have to act with belief in order to detect a response from Him. (And why would a legitimate scientist, who acts with belief in a hypothesis within his own field, question the need for belief here?)

Mr. Hawking has been quoted as saying, “The universe is governed by the laws of science. The laws may have been decreed by God, but God does not intervene to break the laws.” I would agree with his last sentence. I do not know how God set the universe, and all His creations, and our little earth in motion, but I know that he did it according to laws he knows intimately. All things operate according to laws which He decreed and will not violate. I have seen His works, and they testify to me of the order He created to govern the universe and His children.

Moses told the people of Israel, “God doth talk with man, and he liveth” (Deuteronomy 5:24). Moses, we are taught in the Bible, was a personal witness to the glory of God. Few of us will ever have the opportunity to see God as Moses saw. But we have the opportunity to know for ourselves that God exists.

In the beauties of nature, I see not unguided development, but the hand of the foremost scientist and the consummate artist.

In the beauties of nature, I see not unguided development, but the hand of the foremost scientist and the consummate artist.

I know. I have not seen Him as Moses did, but He has made himself manifest to me in my heart and my mind and my life in ways that are incontrovertible—not in abstract impressions, but in personal words of counsel and in concrete actions and events. One involves an event that saved my life, and I have shared the story often with others, but some experiences are so sacred and deeply personal to me that I do not share them.

It would probably not be appropriate for me to transfer my knowledge to another person, even if I could, for it is up to each one of us to learn of His existence through our own relationship with Him. I cannot learn of God’s existence for you, any more than you could learn it for me. Through personal faith, God speaks to each individual’s heart. He does not give someone else the assignment to obtain this knowledge for us.

Moses said that God talks with man. Throughout history God has called prophets to teach us and lead us in His paths, if we will listen to them. There are prophets on earth today. Their calling is to teach and lead. But the knowing Him and His will is still our individual responsibility.

Knowing requires exercising our faith—putting our hearts and actions behind our beliefs. If you need help with this, there is a passage in the Book of Mormon that describes the process of nurturing the little seed of faith, and what we can expect when we do. (Alma chapter 32, verses 26-43—pp. 289-291) But if you already know how to exercise faith without studying the process, then go for it.

We cannot trust the responsibility of knowing to someone else, no matter how intelligent or accomplished that person may appear. Appearances are no substitute for truth that we experience personally. It has always seemed strange to me, and oddly superstitious, when those who trust in science refuse to acknowledge that God may have had a role in creation and organization of the universe and the life found in it. In seeking explanations that rule out His involvement, they offer no concrete evidence; they offer only their own doubts or lack of knowledge. It is as though they are afraid to acknowledge that there could be some Greater Intellect who understands even more about all of this then they do.

I know that God lives. Do you wonder whether this could be true? Don’t ask me, or Stephen Hawking, or someone else. Find out for yourself.